LITTLETON HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Littleton, MA Historic Plaques and Markers

This page contains photographs and descriptions of the historic plaques and markers found in Littleton as of May 2013.

Please note that all of these markers are displayed voluntarily by the property owners. Although many of them were issued by the Littleton Historic Commission they carry no official historic designation from the Town of Littleton.

The Dudley House, built c 1700 at 195 Tahattawan Road. The photograph above was taken in the late 1800s and appears here courtesy of the Littleton Historical Society. See a current photo of the home below.

Almshouse (Poor Farm)

547 Great Road

Built: 1861

Text on plaque

Poor Farm 1861. Also known as town farm and Almshouse. Poor people lived here, operated the farm and consumed and sold its products. This was discontinued in 1919. The basement was once a jail.

Issued by: Littleton Historic Commission

Text from 2009 Freedom's Way Strollin' & Rollin' Tours pamphlet

The Almshouse or poor farm, was purchased by the town in 1825. It was operated for 94 years as a working farm which provided both employment and sustenance for the residents and left a surplus to help defray expenses.

 

Conant's Store

King Street at the Common

Built: 1840

Text on plaque

Conant's Store. Built as a cooperative by a group of townspeople about 1840. Originally a small two story building with an ell to provide a store room and open horse sheds, it was added on to at various times and in 1902 its size was more than doubled by splitting it in half and building between the halves. At various times it housed a post office, grocery, barber shop, department store, cobbler shop, automobile agency, but most often a general store.

Issued by: The Littleton Historical Society

 

Conant Houghton Co. Building - Old Mill

410 Great Road

Built: 1880

Text on plaque

Conant Houghton Co. Building - Old Mill. Built in 1880. First used for evaporating apples and making cider and vinegar. Later expanded to manufacture suspenders, military webbing and most recently elastic webbing. Represents the evolution of industrial architecture from the 19th century to the mid 20th century.

Issued by: Littleton Historic Commission

 

First Baptist Church

461 King Street

Built: 1840

Text on plaque

Baptist Church 1840. Built after the brick meeting house was destroyed by fire. The congregation was organized in 1822 by 30 members who first worshipped on Nashoba Hill and performed baptisms in Lake Nagog.

Issued by: Littleton Historic Commission

 

Garrison House

Powers Road

Built: c. 1675

Text on plaque

Garrison House. A one and half story garrison or block house stood 300 feet west of this marker as early as 1675. It was built for protection against hostile Indians at the time of the King Philip's War. The original well is still at this site.

Issued by: Littleton Historic Commission

 

Lawrence Tavern

Crane Road

Built: 1768

Text on plaque

Lawrence Tavern. Also known as the Hartwell Tavern, was built at this site in 1768. It was struck by lightning and burned in 1893. Here the militiamen refreshed themselves after drilling at Liberty Square.

Issued by: Littleton Historic Commission

 

Littleton Depot I

Harwood Avenue and King Street

Built: 1879

Text on plaque

The Depot.

The Fitchburg Railroad was the first to come to Littleton in 1844. The original station was built in 1845 to the left of this station which was erected in 1879.

The Stoney Brook line of the Boston & Maine, running from North Chelmsford to Groton Junction (now Ayer), had a station in north Littleton from 1848-1928.

Two other stations frequently used by Littleton residents were the east Littleton station (1876-1926) just over the line in Westford and the Willows Station (1848-1927) just over the line in Ayer.

Issued by: The Littleton Historical Society

 

Littleton Depot II

Harwood Avenue and King Street

Built: 1879

Text on plaque

LITTLETON DEPOT 1879

Issued by: Littleton Historic Commission

 

Littleton Depot Shanty

Harwood Avenue and King Street

Text on plaque

GATEKEEPERS SHANTY

Issued by: Littleton Historic Commission

 

Littleton Quarantine Station

127 Harwood Avenue

Built: 1885

Text on plaque

The port of Boston Quarantine Station was first in Waltham and moved to this 32 acre site in 1885. The Littleton meat cattle quarantine station held domestic and wild animals for 90 days to prevent the introduction of disease. It was closed in 1932.

Issued by: Littleton Historic Commission

 

Long Store

Formerly on Great Road across from Littleton Police Station

Built: c 1700

Text on plaque

The Long Store. This building, deeded to 6 men in 1700, housed the first store in Littleton. It served as a cooperage, a grocery and dry goods store and a tavern. At one end an open shed sheltered the ox teams while their owners made their purchases.

Issued by: Littleton Historic Commission

These two pictures taken just prior to the Long Store deconstruction in July 2012. Building materials have been preserved and are in storage, awaiting reconstruction on a site yet to be identified.

 

Mary Shepard/Powers Monument (see also Jeffrey House)

110 Great Road

Text on plaque

SITE OF SHEPARD HOUSE 42 RODS SOUTH. February 12 1676 Mary Shepard 14 years old watched on the hill Quagana for King Philips Indians while her kinsmen Isaac and Jacob were threshing in their barn. The brothers were slain and Mary was taken 50 miles to Wenimisset now New Braintree. She escaped at night on a horse and brought the news of the gathering of the Indians.

Issued by: Concord Antiquarian Society and Littleton Historic Commission

 

Meeting House

Littleton Common

Built: 1717-1723

Text on plaque

Meeting House. Approximate site of the first meeting house. The structure was started about 1717 and completed in 1723. It was used until 1742 for church services as well as for town meetings.

Issued by: Littleton Historic Commission

 

Nashoba Praying Indian Town

Newtown Road and Nashoba Road

Text [formerly] on plaque

Indian Reservation. This marks the northwest corner of a 500 acre reservation set aside for descendants of the Nashoba Praying Indians in 1714. It included portions of Lake Nagog and Fort Pond. It was sold in 1734 by the last Indian, Sarah Doublet, to the Jones family.

Issued by: Littleton Historic Commission

 

East Schoolhouse

540 Newtown Road

Built: 1795

Text on plaque

EAST SCHOOLHOUSE. The original Newtown or East School was built in 1795 not far from this site. This present building housed the school which served this area of town until 1960

NOTE

1960 is apparently a wrong date! Neighbors say it is known that a private family was living in the house in 1942.

Issued by: Littleton Historic Commission

 

West Schoolhouse

Sanderson Road

Built: c1795

Text on plaque

West Schoolhouse. Near this site the first West School was constructed about 1795. The present building is close to the original site and is the only school preserved in its original state.

Issued by: Littleton Historic Commission

 

North School House

Old Great Road

Built: 1795

Text on plaque

Site of North School. Near this site the North School was built in 1795 and rebuilt in 1870. The largest enrollment was 120. The school burned in 1916 and was never rebuilt. The foundation is still visible.

Issued by: Littleton Historic Commission

 

South School House

279 Foster Street

Built: c 1795

Text on plaque

South Schoolhouse. This building housed the South School. The original school was built about 1795 and was moved or rebuilt six times between 1795 and 1870.

Issued by: Littleton Historic Commission

 

Original Settler Cemetery

89 Great Road

Built: 1676

Text on plaque

1676. The burial place of the first white settlers in Littleton is 1300 feet east of this tablet. Erected by the town 1937.

Issued by: Littleton Historic Commission

 

Porter Road Bridge

Built: unknown

Text on plaque

The Acton-Groton Stagecoach Road crossed here. Nearby lived John Porter, who fought in the French and Indian Wars and the Revolution. He joined the Minutemen at Concord on April 19, 1775, was at the Battle of Bennington, the surrender of Cornwallis and on Lafayette's staff, advancing from Ensign to Major. Governor John Hancock appointed him a Colonel on August 17, 1789.

Issued by: The Littleton Historical Society

 

Nagog Hill Orchards

Nagog Hill Road

Text on plaque

This area was home of Indians who farmed, hunted, and fished while living peacefully with white settlers to whom they sold land. Sachem Tahattawan sold 6 sq. miles. Rev. John Eliot converted Indians including Tahattawan to Christianity. In 1654, Nashoba, meaning 'land between the waters,' was named the Sixth Praying Indian town. In 1675 during King Philip's War, Praying Indians were accused of mischief, rounded up and marched to Deer Island in Boston Harbor where many died. Survivors were released in 1677, but only a few returned including Sarah Doublet. They were given 500 acres called New-Town. Sarah Doublet died in 1736, the last Praying Indian. In 1714 Nashoba became Littleton.

Issued by: Littleton Historic Commission

 

Site of Central Hall

300 King Street

Built: c 1800

Text on plaque

Site of Central Hall. Central Hall, built in the early 1800's was a versatile building. Town meetings, Lyceum and dances were held here. Littleton Grange met here as did the Congregational Church. It functioned as our post office, telephone office, restaurant, bakery, gas station and grocery store. It was abandoned in 1979 and burned in 1981.

Issued by: Littleton Historic Commission

 

The Tory House original site (see also Tory House)

300 King Street

Text on plaque

Original site of the Tory House. A volley of lead was fired in 1775 through the door at the Loyalist Reverend Rogers by a band of Patriots when he would not come out and declare his intentions. The house was moved to 280 King Street in 1858.

Issued by: Littleton Historical Commission

 

Warren's Grist Mill

Warren Street and Mill Road

Built: c 1750

Text on plaque

WARREN'S MILL. Started in 1750, this is the oldest continuously operating mill in the country. It began as a grist mill powered by an upright water wheel set in Beaver Brook. After the big blow of 1815, it was converted to a saw mill powered by an upright water wheel set in a sluice from Mill Pond which was created by damming Beaver Brook. In 1920 it was converted to electric power. A fire in 1968 burned the box factory.

Issued by: Littleton Historic Commission

 

Jeremiah Cogswell House

46 Beaver Brook Road

Built: 1750

Text on plaque

JEREMIAH COGSWELL HOUSE. Circa 1750

Issued by: Littleton Historical Commission

 

Albert and Hattie Hopkins House

2 Foster Street

Built: 1908

Style: Victorian Eclectic

Text on plaque

ALBERT & HATTIE HOPKINS HOUSE. 1908. Albert was Town Lamplighter and first Fire Chief.

Issued by: Littleton Historical Commission

Text from 2009 Freedom's Way Strollin' & Rollin' Tours pamphlet

This home was built by the town's first Fire Chief, Albert Hopkins. Note the wrap-around veranda and compass window on the east side.

 

The Rev. Wm. H. White House

4 Foster Street

Built: 1828

Text on plaque

1828. THE REV. WM. H. WHITE HOUSE. Home of Littleton's 4th Unitarian Minister and his daughter, Sarah, the town's 1st librarian

Issued by: privately placed

 

Rebecca and Dr. Paul Kittredge House

6 Foster Street

Built: pre 1830

Style: Victorian Eclectic

Text on plaque

DR. PAUL &: REBECCA KITTREDGE HOUSE, CIRCA 1830.

Issued by: Littleton Historical Commission

Text from 2009 Freedom's Way Strollin' & Rollin' Tours pamphlet

This was the home of Dr Paul Kittredge and later, Dr. John Miles. Later still it was the home of Abraham Mead and Lucy Kimball Mead. Her tomb can be found in the Old Burying Ground on King Street

 

Widow Baker House

23 Foster Street

Built: c 1790

Style: Altered, astylistic

Text on plaque

WIDOW BAKER HOUSE Circa 1790

Issued by: Littleton Historical Commission

Text from 2009 Freedom's Way Strollin' & Rollin' Tours pamphlet

Hannah Rogers, school teacher at the Center School lived here.

 

Green-Lawrence House

571 Great Road

Text on plaque

Green-Lawrence House c. 1781

Issued by: Littleton Historic Commission

 

Jeffrey House (also site of Mary Shepard Monument)

110 Great Road

Text on plaque

Jeffrey House Circa 1837

Issued by: Littleton Historic Commission

 

Oliver Whitcomb House

31 Foster Street

Built: c1725

Style: Colonial with Federal detail

Text on plaque

OLIVER WHITCOMB HOUSE C1725

Issued by: Littleton Historical Commission

Text from 2009 Freedom's Way Strollin' & Rollin' Tours pamphlet

Oliver Whitcomb was a blacksmith and descendant of an original settler of Littleton

 

Fox Tavern

35 Foster Street

Built: c 1700

Style: modified/Georgian and Colonial Revival

Text on plaque

FOX TAVERN C1700. This was the village tavern kept by Capt, John Fox in the French & Indian War. Tory Capt. Leonard Whiting from 1762-1770, and Patriot leader William H. Prentice during the Revolution. The local Patriots made their headquarters here.

Issued by: Littleton Historical Commission

Text from 2009 Freedom's Way Strollin' & Rollin' Tours pamphlet

Last used as a tavern around the time of the Revolution where it was a meeting place for local patriots. Operated by William Henry Prentice, the local Patriot leader. Littleton minutemen answered the call and marched to Concord in 1775.

 

Rev. William Channing Brown House

36 Foster Street

Built: c 1905

Style: Colonial Revival

Text on plaque

REVEREND WILLIAM CHANNING BROWN HOUSE BUILT 1905

Issued by: Littleton Historical Commission

Text from 2009 Freedom's Way Strollin' & Rollin' Tours pamphlet

Rev. William Channing Brown was pastor of the Unitarian Church (1898-mid 1920s) and he also served as Town Clerk and Town Treasurer. This house was built by Needham and Fletcher. Note the widow's walk.

 

Braddock James House

40 Foster Street

Built: pre 1790

Style: Colonial Saltbox form

Text on plaque

BRADDOCK JACOBS HOUSE C. 1790

Issued by: Littleton Historical Commission

Text from 2009 Freedom's Way Strollin' & Rollin' Tours pamphlet

This house was in the Jacobs family for over 100 years, then owned by the Priest family for another 100 years.

 

Edmund Sherman Tuttle House

63 Foster Street

Built: c 1850

Style: Victorian Eclectic

Text on plaque

The E.S. TUTTLE HOUSE C. 1850

Issued by: Littleton Historical Commission

Text from 2009 Freedom's Way Strollin' & Rollin' Tours pamphlet

This house was later owned by Horatio Sherman Smith

 

Brown-Barker House

158 Hartwell Avenue

Built: c 1810

Text on plaque

Brown-Barker House. c 1810

Issued by: Littleton Historical Commission

 

Reed Farm

5 Hartwell Avenue

Built: c 1780

Text on plaque

The Reed Farm House circa 1780

Issued by: Littleton Historical Commission

The Reed Farm House was originally located within the cloverleaf of Rt 495 and Rt 119. Before construction began at that intersection it was moved to it's present location on Hartwell Avenue.

 

Captain Thomas Nye Simon Tuttle House

514 King Street

Built: c 1720

Text on plaque

Captain Thomas Nye Simon Tuttle House c. 1720

Issued by: Littleton Historic Commission

 

Dr Roland Phelps House

305 King Street

Built: 1774

Text on plaque

Doctor Phelps House 1774

Issued by: Littleton Historic Commission

 

Farmhouse at Common

529 King Street

Built: c 1830

Text on plaque

Built in 1830 as a Farmhouse.

Issued by: Littleton Historic Commission

 

The Tory House (see also Tory House Original Site)

280 King Street

Built: c 1770

Style: Georgian

Text on plaque

TORY HOUSE Ca. 1716. Home of Daniel Rogers, Littleton's Second Minister and Tory Sympathizer. During the Revolutionary War, Patriots came to this house and demanded that the Rev. Rogers come out and declare his principles. When he did not appear, the Patriots fired, piercing the front door and stair panel with musket balls. The original door can be seen at the Littleton Historical Society.

Issued by: Littleton Historical Commission

Text from 2009 Freedom's Way Strollin' & Rollin' Tours pamphlet

Originally built by Isaac Powers, this house was moved to this site in 1858 from 300 King Street The Tory House was the scene of a confrontation between the Loyalist Rev. Rogers and local patriots. Shots were fired through the front doors, which, with their bullet holes, can be seen at the historical Society on Rogers Street

 

Marion Fitch House

333 King Street

Built: c 1820

Style: Center Entry Cottage

Text on plaque

Marion Fitch House c 1820.

Issued by: Littleton Historical Commission

Text from 2009 Freedom's Way Strollin' & Rollin' Tours pamphlet

Marion Fitch purchased this house in 1969 and upon her death in 1983 she left it to the Historical Society. It became the first town history museum.

 

Daniel and James Kimball House (also Hager Homestead)

336 King Street

Built: c 1795

Style: Federal with brick side walls

Text on plaque

House was first occupied by Deacon James Kimball and his brother Daniel sons of Lieutenant Daniel Kimball, a Revolutionary War veteran. For several years the house was used as a circulating library.

Issued by: Littleton Historical Commission

Text from 2009 Freedom's Way Strollin' & Rollin' Tours pamphlet

Owned by both Daniel and Deacon James Kimball, this property was the L.A. Hager Dairy Farm. Hager was known for selling the soft drink Moxie in the 1940's. He drove around town in the "Moxie Horsemobile', a vehicle mounted with a fake horse. The driver's seat was the horse saddle.

 

Hager Homestead (also Daniel and James Kimball House)

336 King Street

Built: c 1795

Style: Federal with brick side walls

Text on plaque

Hager Homestead Circa 1795

Issued by: privately placed

Text from 2009 Freedom's Way Strollin' & Rollin' Tours pamphlet

Owned by both Daniel and Deacon James Kimball, this property was the L.A. Hager Dairy Farm. Hager was known for selling the soft drink Moxie in the 1940's. He drove around town in the "Moxie Horsemobile', a vehicle mounted with a fake horse. The driver's seat was the horse saddle.

 

The Reed-Wood House

20 Meetinghouse Road

Built: 1780

Text on brown plaque

THE REED-WOOD PLACE 20 MEETINGHOUSE HAS BEEN PLACED ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES BY THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 1780.

Text on green plaque

This house, the first privately owned home in Littleton was placed on the National Historic Register and saved from demolition in the mid 1990's by Attorney Paul J. Tiernan and his wife, Kathleen Tiernan.

They named the property "The Reed-Wood House". The Reeds were the first identifiable occupants c. 1780. The last owners before the Tiernans were Rose Wood and her husband George Wood. They owned and operated the first gas station on Great Road in the 1920's. The oldest section of the Reed-Wood home dates from around 1780.

Meetinghouse Road was named for the location of the first meeting house located opposite this structure.

Issued by: privately placed

 

Russell House

8 Murray Park Road

Built: c 1700

Text on brown plaque

Russell House c 1700

 

Nathan Tuttle House

549 Newtown Road

Built: 1821

Text on plaque

Nathan Tuttle House 1821

Issued by: Littleton Historical Commission.

 

Ruth Frost House

511 Newtown Road

Built: 1830

Text on plaque

Ruth Frost House c 1830

Issued by: Littleton Historical Commission.

 

Whitney-Hoar House

564 Newtown Road

Built: 1685

Text on plaque

Whitney-Hoar, 1685. One of the [sic] Littleton's earliest houses. It was standing nearly 30 years before the incorporation of the town. The Nashoba Indians were frequent callers and are known to have had Thanksgiving Dinner here.

Issued by: Unknown. The Littleton Historical Society.

 

The Bandbox House

7 Rogers Street

Built: 1830-1857

Style: Gothic Revival

Text on plaque

BANDBOX HOUSE CIRCA 1830. TOWN TELEPHONE OFFICE, 1929-1943.

Issued by: Littleton Historical Commission

Text from 2009 Freedom's Way Strollin' & Rollin' Tours pamphlet

This house was owned by Reuben Hoar, for whom the public library was named under conditions of an anonymous benefactor, later identified to be William Stevens Houghton. Note the scalloped bargeboard on this atypical Gothic Revival. The local telephone office was housed here in the 1930's.

 

Reverend Benjamin Shattuck House

11 Shattuck Street

Built: c 1717

Style: Colonial with Federal and Italianate details

Text on plaque

BENJAMIN SHATTUCK PLACE 1717 Built for Rev. Benjamin Shattuck, Littleton's first Minister & Moderator.

Issued by: Littleton Historical Commission

Text from 2009 Freedom's Way Strollin' & Rollin' Tours pamphlet

Rev. Benjamin Shattuck, a Harvard graduate, was the first minister of Littleton, ordained in 1717.

 

Nathan Hartwell Jr House, front

12 Shattuck Street

Built: c 1730

Style: Georgian/Federal

Text on plaque

NATHAN HARTWELL, Jnr HOUSE, 1730. Pickard Dairy Farm from 1908 to 1940's. Formerly had been a Private School and then a Town Library. During the Railroad Years it was a Rooming House.

This was the private secondary school, Brigham Private High School, in the mid-1800s. tuition was 25 cents per day. William Pickard owned an extensive dairy farm here, c 1916.

Issued by: Littleton Historical Commission

 

Nathan Hartwell Jr House, back

12 Shattuck Street

Built: c 1730

Style: Georgian/Federal

Text on plaque

NATHAN HARTWELL, JR. Formerly a Private School & then a Town Library. During the Railroad Years a [sic] was a Rooming House

Issued by: Littleton Historical Commission

Text from 2009 Freedom's Way Strollin' & Rollin' Tours pamphlet

This was the private secondary school, Brigham Private High School, in the mid-1800s. tuition was 25 cents per day. William Pickard owned an extensive dairy farm here, c 1916.

 

Dudley House

195 Tahattawan Road

Built: c 1700

Text on plaque

Dudley House, c1700

Issued by: privately placed

 

Robbins Farm

195 Tahattawan Road

Built: c 1839

Text on plaque

Robbins Farm, 1839

Issued by: Littleton Historical Commission

 

Timothy Sullivan House

152 Tahattawan Road

Built: c 1894

Text on plaque

Timothy Sullivan House, 1894

Issued by: Littleton Historical Commission

 

Warren House

47 Warren Street

Built: c 1728

Text on plaque

Warren House, Circa 1728

Issued by: Littleton Historical Commission

 

Project by Tom Howes, Littleton, Massachusetts. Thanks to the Littleton Historic Commission, the Littleton Historical Society, and the Littleton Police Department for their assistance.